Voters

America’s next model energy code will be determined by local governments.

Between 2006 and 2012, the efficiency of the IECC improved about 38%. However, efficiency gains stalled in the past two code update cycles (2015 and 2018), costing consumers and business owners thousands in energy bill savings.

Of the 20,000 potential voters (Governmental Member Voting Representatives, or GMVRs) eligible to vote in the last code cycle, only about 500 cast votes for IECC proposals. If just 500 more pro-efficiency votes had been cast during the last code cycle, the 2018 IECC would be 10% more efficient than it is today, already reducing carbon emissions, saving households and business thousands in reduced energy bills, and setting America on track for reduced reliance on energy.

We need your vote to make that critical difference this time. To make things as easy as possible, we will provide you with everything you need, including step-by-step instructions on how to participate, and EECC’s forthcoming Voting Guide, which will provide a summary and analysis of the key IECC proposals that EECC recommends voting on — whether for or against. The Voting Guide will be available closer to the time of voting, when all proposals are on the table. EECC’s Voting Guide can help you identify the most critical proposed changes and give you the information you need to help you decide how to vote.

Why it’s Important How to Vote Voting Resources

Voters

America’s next model energy code will be determined by local governments.

Between 2006 and 2012, the efficiency of the IECC improved about 38%. However, efficiency gains stalled in the past two code update cycles (2015 and 2018), costing consumers and business owners thousands in energy bill savings.

Of the 20,000 potential voters (Governmental Member Voting Representatives, or GMVRs) eligible to vote in the last code cycle, only about 500 cast votes for IECC proposals. If just 500 more pro-efficiency votes had been cast during the last code cycle, the 2018 IECC would be 10% more efficient than it is today, already reducing carbon emissions, saving households and business thousands in reduced energy bills, and setting America on track for reduced reliance on energy.

We need your vote to make that critical difference this time. To make things as easy as possible, we will provide you with everything you need, including step-by-step instructions on how to participate, and EECC’s forthcoming Voting Guide, which will provide a summary and analysis of the key IECC proposals that EECC recommends voting on — whether for or against. The Voting Guide will be available closer to the time of voting, when all proposals are on the table. EECC’s voting guides will help you identify the most critical proposed changes and give you the information you need to help you decide how to vote.

Why it’s important

How to vote

Voting resources

The energy code is the ONLY building code that pays for itself.

The energy code is the ONLY building code that pays for itself.

The slight incremental cost increase for energy code improvements pays for itself, then makes money for building owners and homeowners every month in the form of lower energy bills. Energy codes make homeownership more affordable and reduce the risk of foreclosure. Reduced monthly expenses leads to greater profitability for businesses, more economic viability for families and businesses, and stronger communities overall.

Energy codes don’t just save money, they protect people, too.

Energy codes don’t just save money, they protect people, too.

Buildings last a long time — a new home or building will receive 1,200 energy bills over its 100-year lifespan. How you vote on the 2021 IECC will determine how high those energy bills will be for generations of people who live and work in those buildings. Reduced monthly bills means fewer home foreclosures, additional expendable income for families, more profitable local businesses, and stronger local economies overall. Energy codes….

…strengthen families and local economies.

Lower energy bills allow home and business owners to keep more money every month– reducing foreclosure rates, and strengthening local businesses.

…improve indoor air quality.

Energy codes assure a separation between indoor and outdoor air, reducing air pollution such as auto exhaust that enters from a garage or radon that seeps in from underneath a foundation. Energy codes require leaks to be sealed and that outdoor air enters safely via whole-house ventilation.

…improve durability.

Uncontrolled air leaks and moisture enter framing cavities if they aren’t well-sealed. When warm air contacts a cooler surface, water condenses and can cause rot, mold and mildew that destroy a building’s integrity and can devastate an occupant’s health. Energy codes help manage moisture so buildings last longer.

…protect from extreme weather crises.

A tight, well-insulated building will maintain indoor temperatures longer and allow people to “shelter in place” longer during power outages, which could mean the difference between life and death as people await help.

Who can vote to update energy codes, and how?

Who can vote to update energy codes, and how?

Only ICC Governmental Members can vote in November 2019. If enough pro-efficiency officials register and vote, we can boost the efficiency of new buildings, improve safey and save consumers tens of thousands via lower energy bills. We need your votes.

Who can be a Governmental Member?

Any governmental unit, department or agency engaged in the administration, formulation, implementation or enforcement of laws, ordinances, rules or regulations relating to the public health, safety and welfare is eligible to register as an ICC “Governmental Member” and vote on proposed code updates. Governmental Members are typically city, county or state agencies such as fire districts, building departments, sustainability offices, mayor’s offices, and public power entities.

GMVR Registration

The Primary Representative for each Governmental Member may register a set number of voters called “Governmental Member Voting Representatives” or “GMVRs,” based on their town’s population.

Population (by thousands) 0-50 50 + 150 +
ICC Annual Dues per department $135 $240 $370
Votes (GMVRs) per registered Gov. Member 4 8 12

There are many quick ways to improve your GMVR turnout. Take these steps to ensure you’re represented.

If possible, submit all GMVRs during ICC registration. Although your full roster of GMVRs doesn’t have to be submitted until September 23, 2019, it’s ideal to get this done now and know this critical task is complete.

Assign someone responsible for ensuring that all GMVRs cast votes in November 2019. Ideally, this will be your Primary Representative. If not, designate another individual to this task.

Find out of if there are others in your city/state who have already joined or are eligible to join, and make them aware of the forthcoming EECC Voting Guide to make voting as efficient as possible.

Staying informed will help you make as big an impact as possible. Sign up to receive reminders and a Voting Guide at www.energyefficientcodes.org.

Stay Up to Date

Sign up here to receive reminders about important dates pertaining to the ICC's IECC code update schedule, potential scholarships for travel to code hearings, and to receive a copy of the EECC Voter Guide when it becomes available (closer to when voting takes place).






Our nation excels because we have the world’s most productive, creative, and innovative private sector. When we develop products and practices that improve building safety and put thousands of dollars into the wallets of homeowners, it is critical that these developments are updated in building codes and standards. That way, building inspectors remain familiar with new technologies, and citizens and businesses can benefit from the energy savings they bring.

Energy Efficient Codes Coalition Copyright
Privacy Policy   •   Site Map   •   ase.org

Contact Us

If you have any questions, comments, or other feedback, please fill out the fields below and we will respond as soon as possible.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.